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Launching the Fortnight for Freedom


ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT

Source:
First Things
Type:
Bishops, Priests
Date:
6/21/2012

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ABSTRACTLaunching the Fortnight for Freedom | First Things Home Visit the Home Page Print Edition Current Edition Previous Edition Archive Subscribe On the Square Latest Feature Archive Blogs Evangel Secondhand Smoke First Thoughts Postmodern Conservative Events Coming Events Recent Events Advertising Advertise on First Things Donate Support First Things About Us Masthead ROFTERS Contact Us Submissions Store Shop First Things Affiliate Books Subscribe Subscribe Customer Service Search First Things 2012 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun 2011 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2009 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2008 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2005 Sep Oct Nov Dec Launching the Fortnight for Freedom Jun 21, 2012 Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. This speech was delivered last night in Indianapolis to a group of Catholic journalists on the eve of the �Fortnight for Freedom,� a national campaign of teaching, witness, and prayer against the abortifacient and contraceptive mandate and in favor or religious freedom. I�ve known Greg Erlandson as a friend for many years. So I was glad to accept his invitation to join you tonight. And I�m very glad to speak on the theme of religious liberty because events in our country have made it an urgent concern. I can sum up my remarks tonight in five simple points. First, religious freedom is a cornerstone of the American experience. This is so obvious that once upon a time, nobody needed to say it. But times have changed. So it�s worth recalling that Madison, Adams, Washington, Hamilton, Franklin, Jefferson�in fact, nearly all the American founders�saw religious faith as vital to the life of a free people. Liberty and happiness grow organically out of virtue. And virtue needs grounding in religious faith. Gertrude Himmelfarb, the historian, put it this way: The founders knew that in a republic, �virtue is intimately related to religion. However skeptical or deistic they may have been in their own beliefs, however determined they were to avoid anything like an established Church, they had no doubt that religion is an essential part of the social order because it is a vital part of the moral order.� Here�s my second point: Freedom of religion is more than freedom of worship. The right to worship is a necessary but not sufficient part of religious liberty. Christian faith requires community. It begins in worship, but it also demands preaching, teaching, and service. It�s always personal but never private. And it involves more than prayer at home and Mass on Sunday�though these things are vitally important. Real faith always bears fruit in public witness and public action. Otherwise it�s just empty words. The founders saw the value of publicly engaged religious faith because they experienced its influence themselves. They created a nation designed in advance to depend on the moral convictions of religious believers, and to welcome their active role in public life. Here�s my third point: Threats against religious freedom in our country are not imaginary. They�re happening right now. They�re immediate, serious, and real. Earlier this year religious liberty advocates won a big Supreme Court victory in the 9-0 Hosanna-Tabor v EEOC decision. That�s the good news. Here�s the bad news: What�s stunning in that case is the disregard for religious freedom shown by the government�s arguments against the Lutheran church and school. And Hosanna-Tabor is not an isolated case. It belongs to a pattern of government coercion that includes the current administration�s HHS mandate; interfering with the conscience rights of medical providers and private employers, as well as individual citizens; and attacks on the policies, hiring practices, and tax statuses of religious charities and ministries. Why is this hostility happening? A lot of it links to Catholic teaching on the dignity of life and human sexuality. Catholic moral convictions about abortion, contraception, the purpose of sexuality, and the nature of marriage are rooted not just in revelation, but also in reason and natural law. Human beings have a nature that�s not just the product of accident or culture, but inherent, universal, and rooted in permanent truths knowable to reason. The problem, as Notre Dame law professor Gerry Bradley points out, is that critics of the Church reduce all these moral convictions to an expression of subjective religious beliefs. And if they�re purely religious beliefs, then�so the critics argue�they can�t be rationally defended. And because they�re rationally indefensible, they should be treated as a form of prejudice. In effect, 2,000 years of moral tradition and religious belief become a species of bias. Opposi.......