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Cardinal Dolan: That ‘Conscience Thing’ Is ‘Ennobling,’ ‘Enlightened’


KATHRYN JEAN LOPEZ

Source:
National Review
Type:
Media/Opinion
Date:
9/11/2012

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ABSTRACTCardinal Dolan: That ‘Conscience Thing’ Is ‘Ennobling,’ ‘Enlightened’ - By Kathryn Jean Lopez - The Corner - National Review Online Get FREE NRO Newsletters   Log In   |   Register Follow Us     September 10 Issue  Subscribe to NR  Renew  September 10 Issue   |   Subscribe   |   Renew Home The Corner The Agenda Campaign Spot The Home Front Right Field Bench Memos The Feed The Tyranny Blog Media Blog Audio & Video The Latest Three Martini Lunch Uncommon Knowledge Between the Covers Ricochet Kudlow’s Money Politic$ David Calling Exchequer Phi Beta Cons Planet Gore Critical Condition Tweet Tracker NR / Digital Subscribe: NR Subscribe: NR / Digital Give: NR / Digital NR Renewals & Changes Shop! Donate Media Kit Contact Close To: Your Email: Your Name: Subject: Hanson: The Ripples of 9/11 Editors: Chi-Town Shakedown Botwinick: Atheists vs. the 9/11 Cross White: The Decline and Fall of Catholic Democrats? Editors: Fear Not the Bounce Rosett: The Real Rules of the U.N. Human Rights Council Pipes: Democrats Fib Again about Israel Charen: Why Bill Clinton Is All Wet Sowell: Democrats, God, and Jerusalem Prager: ‘God,’ ‘Jerusalem,’ and the DNC Lowry: The Lost Ethic of Fraser Robinson Capretta: The Medicare Distortions Editors: The Democrats’ GM Fiction Beauprez: Obama Doubled the Jobs Deficit Barone: The Magic of 2008 Eludes Obama Fund: ‘None of the Above’ Should Be on the Ballot Lopez: Let Dems Lie? McCarthy: Double-Minded Republicans Steyn: A Nation of Sandra Flukes Kudlow: Obama’s Same Old, Same Old New on NRO . . . The Corner The one and only. About This Blog Archive E-Mail RSS Send Print   |  Text   Cardinal Dolan: That ‘Conscience Thing’ Is ‘Ennobling,’ ‘Enlightened’ By  Kathryn Jean Lopez September 11, 2012 12:20 P.M. Comments 3 “Government has no business interfering in the internal life of the soul, conscience, or church,” Timothy Cardinal Dolan said Monday night at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. In an event on religious liberty in America sponsored by the John Carroll Society , Cardinal Dolan sought to “restore the luster” on our “first and most cherished freedom.” “The threats to [that] freedom are abundant,” he said. He focused on two timely ones: First, a secularist drive that “will tolerate religion as long as it’s just considered some eccentric private hobby for superstitious, unenlightened folks, limited to an hour on the Sabbath, with no claim to any voice in the public square.” This “is hardly ‘free exercise,’” he countered, and quoted the first lady speaking at the African Methodist Episcopal Church Conference, where she seemed to understand this: “Our faith just isn’t about showing up on Sunday . . . it’s about what we do on Monday through Saturday.” And then “America’s shepherd,” as Speaker of the House John Boehner introduced him for the final prayer at the Republican convention in Tampa, highlighted the HHS contraception, sterilization, and abortion-inducing-drug mandate that currently has his New York archdiocese suing the federal government, calling it “a direct intrusion of the government into the very definition of a church’s minister, ministries, message, and meaning.” The HHS mandate controversy, he repeated, is about “the raw presumption of a bureau of the federal government to define a church’s minister, ministry, message, and meaning.” “The defense of religious freedom is not some Evangelical Christian polemic, or wily strategy of discredited Catholic bishops,” the president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops said, countering the media narrative, “but the quintessential American cause, the first line in the defense of and protection of human rights.” “Freedom of religion,” he said, “has been the driving force of almost every enlightened, unshackling, noble cause in American history,” the cause of some of our most “liberating, ennobling” movements, including the civil-rights movement, he said. In defending religious liberty today, he said, we are “protecting America. We act not as sectarians, but as responsible citizens. We act on .......